Eid al-Fitr is a joyous festival that marks the end of Ramadan, the Islamic holy month of fasting. It is celebrated in different ways around the world, with each culture bringing its own unique traditions to the festivities. In this blog post, we’ll take a look at some of the diverse ways in which this festival is celebrated around the world.

  1. Eid in Saudi Arabia

In Saudi Arabia, this festival is celebrated with great fanfare. The festivities start with the sighting of the new moon, which marks the end of Ramadan. On the Big day, people dress up in their finest clothes and attend special prayers at the mosque. After the prayers, they visit their friends and family, exchange gifts, and feast on traditional dishes.

  1. Turkey

Wanna know what is the Turkish word for Eid? It is known as “┼×eker Bayram─▒”, which means “Sugar Festival”. This is because sweet treats such as baklava, Turkish delight, and halva are an important part of the celebrations. People in Turkey also dress up in new clothes and attend special prayers at the mosque. In addition, it is a common tradition to visit the graves of loved ones.

  1. Indonesia

The Indonesians call it, “Hari Raya Idul Fitri”. The festivities start with the “takbiran”, which is a series of loud and rhythmic chants that are heard throughout the night before Eid. On the day, people attend special prayers at the mosque, and then visit their friends and family. Traditional dishes such as “ketupat” (rice cakes wrapped in palm leaves) and “rendang” (spicy beef stew) are commonly served.

  1. How do Indians celebrate Eid?

In India, it is known as “Eid-ul-Fitr” or “Chand Raat”. The celebrations start with the sighting of the new moon, after which people dress up in new clothes and attend special prayers at the mosque. After the prayers, they visit their friends and family, exchange gifts, and feast on traditional dishes such as biryani, kebabs, and sheer khurma (a sweet vermicelli pudding).

  1. Egypt

In Egypt, the festival is known as “Eid el-Saghir”. The celebrations start with the “Fanoos Ramadan”, which is a lantern that is hung outside homes and shops during the month of Ramadan. On the day, people attend special prayers at the mosque, and then visit their friends and family. Traditional dishes such as “kahk” (butter cookies) and “fatta” (a meat and rice dish) are commonly served during Eid.

So…

It is a festival that brings people together from different cultures and backgrounds. While the traditions may differ, the spirit of joy, gratitude, and generosity is universal. We hope this post has given you a glimpse into the diverse ways in which Eid is celebrated around the world. Happy Eid!

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